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Einstein’s Quotes on Buddhism October 26, 2007

Posted by Philip Ryan in Random Notes.
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6.23 Confucius said, “When a cornered vessel no longer has any corners, should it be called a cornered vessel? Should it?” – The Analects, quoted in Wing-Tsit Chan’s Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 1963

The Confucian school, like many other schools of Chinese philosophy, had a theory about names and actuality, commonly called the “rectification of names.” The Confucians held that the rectification of names was an ethical project, not merely a metaphysical or logical concern, because all things must be fit into their proper scheme in the universe. But you don’t have to be a Confucian to want to set the record straight on Buddhism and the quotes about it attributed to various luminaries and used to promote (or defend?) the dharma.

To wit: There are two similar versions of a prominent Einstein quote on Buddhism floating around the web, reproducing themselves in viral fashion. They are:

Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future: It transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and the spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.

and:

The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism.

These quotes are rarely said to come from a particular book or speech, but we sometimes see this attribution:

Albert Einstein, The Human Side, edited by Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Princeton University Press, 1954

humanside.gifNow, this book is subtitled New Glimpses From His Archives and is not by Einstein, so the quote may not actually be his, but someone quoting him or paraphrasing him, as pointed out on the E-Sangha discussion forums (see below for more on that). The two slightly different versions of the quote given above may lend support to that theory. But if so, this should be noted when the quotes are used. A Google Books search of The Human Side yields no hits for the word “Buddhism” but rather one and only one for “Buddha”:

Page 70
What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind.

So these quotes seem to be spurious. (Some pages of the book are omitted from Google’s preview, but the entire book seems to be searchable. As I haven’t read the book myself I admit the possibility that these quotes may lurk elsewhere in the work — if so, perhaps some intrepid searcher will at last unearth them.) There is much valuable discussion of this very issue on WikiQuote, the discussion forums of the Buddhist Society of Western Australia, and E-Sangha. (You need to be registered to view the E-Sangha boards.) Also look at Religious Tolerance‘s comments on this issue.

If you Google these quotes, you’ll find they’re all over the place on sites devoted to Buddhism, Einstein, and science, from The Buddhist Blog to the Progressive Buddhism blog (which recently had a long back-and-forth about a spurious Buddha quote [make that "possibly spurious" -- see comment below] used by Paul Carus, author of the popular Gospel of Buddha.) A bogus Einsteinism also appeared in Tricycle promotional material several years back before the sagacious Kenneth Kraft set the record straight.

Bogus quotes reproduced on the web are a problem that comes up quite often. I think one of the candidates in this current, already exhausting Presidential election cycle got caught in a trap like this, and the more we rely on the web and neglect primary sources (and actual books), the more this will happen, and it may give us something much more pernicious than this Einstein issue.

So these quotes, interesting and entertaining as they are, should be shelved, or at least have the Einstein attribution removed, until someone can tell us from whence they originally came.

- Philip Ryan, Web Editor

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Comments»

1. Tom Armstrong - October 26, 2007

Ah! Good stuff, your post, Phil.

I’m the one that used the perhaps-spurious quote from Carus. I say ‘perhaps,” since we now have a new lead and I might yet find the quote, but even then, coming from a 19th Century translation, it could prove not to be Buddha’s meaning.

Tricycle has some problems in these areas, btw, which I wish it would correct. It wouldn’t take much, you know. Human error, we all can understand all that.

There’s an interview of Red Pine in Trike, years ago, where he says that his father was placed in nomination for the presidency by Eleanor Roosevelt. Didn’t happen. EASY to check that one out. Actually, it’s a revealing moment, since I believe Red Pine’s book, mentioned in the interview, is wholly bogus. In 1988 did Red Pine stand up and encourage students headed off to Beijing to demand liberty from their government? Probably not. Methinks Mr. Pine has a bit of a Zelig problem.

An interview of Reggie Ray, in the pages of Trike, was done by his close colleague and not “by Tricycle.” This should be corrected, even as late as now, I should think.

There are myriad factual errors in an article called “Down Home Dharma.” Tricycle might feel an obligation to correct the record.

Now is a time of ombudsmen at newspapers — The NY Times, The Post, The Sac Bee — to try to get things right. Hooray, that. Tricycle should try that, too. Don’t you think? And should not neglect the past.

Getting the facts right is important for its own sake.

2. Tom Armstrong - October 26, 2007

Doing a bit of housecleaning. Checking on my vessel corners.

I looked up the word ‘spurious.’ Did you know this about the word …

spurious
1598, “born out of wedlock,” from L. spurius “illegitimate, false” (cf. It. spurio, Sp. espurio ), from spurius (n.) “illegitimate child,” probably from Etruscan spural “public.” Sense of “having an irregular origin, not properly constituted” is from 1601; that of “false, sham” is from 1615.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper

An ugly word that ‘spurious.’ A lot like the word ‘gypped’ that I used to use, before learning its origins. ‘Spurious’ has spurious origins, I guess you could say — but I wouldn’t. ‘Spurious’ has meretricious origins, maybe, if I better understood what ‘meretricious’ means.

It’s hard to keep the universe in its proper scheme.

3. Einstein and Buddha, together again « Tricycle Editors’ Blog - November 21, 2007

[...] may remember our post on bogus Einstein quotes (about Buddhism) floating around the web. I recently came across this book, Einstein and Buddha, The Parallel [...]

4. El Topo - April 12, 2008

“What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind”

I don’t think THAT one is spurious

ELD - December 22, 2009

It is not. That’s a legitimate Einstein quote.

5. joe - April 21, 2008

swicked

6. Michael Radich - May 9, 2008

Dear Phillip,

This puts me in mind of the famous “Toynbee” quote:

” Buddhism has transformed every culture it has entered, and Buddhism has been transformed by its entry into that culture . . . . The coming of Buddhism to the West may well prove to be the most important event of the Twentieth Century.”

Do you know if this attribution is genuine? I have only been able to find authors quoting it from other authors (rather than Toynbee himself); certainly no reference to an actual locus in a published Toynbee work.

Thank you,

7. mike - May 12, 2008

There is a book with dialogue between Toynbee and Buddhist lay leader Daisaku Ikeda. Quite brilliant discussion. Maybe it came from that. I think its called Choose Life or something like that.

8. David Brooks on “neural Buddhism” « Tricycle Editors’ Blog - May 13, 2008

[...] seems to be the “Buddhism is the religion of the future” meme [...]

9. Ben Wolfe - June 3, 2008

Einstien also said the following.

“The most beautiful and profound emotion we can experience is the sensation of the mystical. It is the source of all true science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their primitive forms — this knowledge, this feeling, is at the center of true religion.”

and,

“A human being is part of the whole that we call the universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest — a kind of optical illusion of his consciousness. This illusion is a prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for only the few people nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living beings and all of nature.”

and,

“The true value of a human being can be found in the degree to which he has obtained liberation from the self.”

[All three are cited in 'The Enlightened Mind,' ed. Stephen Mitchell; New York: Harper Collins, 1991]

These two quotations from Einstein’s letters are also of value in this discussion:

“Mere unbelief in a personal God is no philosophy at all.” [Letter to V. T. Aaltonen (7 May 1952), Einstein Archive 59-059]

“I am a deeply religious nonbeliever… This is a somewhat new kind of religion.” [Letter to Hans Muehsam (30 March 1954), Einstein Archive 38-434]

Andrew - October 16, 2010

The one quote is slightly different and I am not sure which is correct now…
“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us _universe_, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

Ruwan - June 29, 2011

true even if the source of the Buddhism quotes may need verification ( that in no way proves them incorrect) his disbelief of God and religions that believe in such Gods is well documented.

10. grant czerepak - August 25, 2008

Whether Einstein said our next religion will be cosmic or not is interesting, but the content of the quote is relevant. In my own explorations I have found that we have moved from a logic (creationist) to a organic (humanist) to a methodic (mechanist) to a pragmatic (materialist) religion and are indeed on the cusp of a cosmic (globalist) religion. The step beyond cosmic appears to be chronic (eventist) but I do not know what that implies.

11. Rafael Espericueta - November 9, 2008

Einstein may not have said those particular words, but they are nonetheless interesting comments, regardless of who said them.

Buddhism does have a deep resonance with the modern theories of physics and the other sciences. Buddhist philosophy and scientific philosophy are very compatable. To be a good scientist one must not be attached to ones concepts!

Alas, I was a tiny bit attached to the concept that Einstein had been the source of the quotations here being discussed. But I’m happy to let go of said concepts.

I recommend to all the practice of disolving ALL concepts.
( Swami Beyondananda calls this “mental flossing”. )

Yours in the Dharma,

-Rafael Espericueta
Shimmering Void Zen Center

12. Yatungwa - January 3, 2009

I have not read any book by Einstein and therefore can’t say whether or not he said the things about buddhism attributed to him. But reading about the two pillars of modern physics namely relativity and quantum mechanics, I am led to believe he might have said those. If you read buddhist tenets like Dependent-origination, Emptiness and Impermanence etc, you will see how close they approximate the conclusions of modern physics.

13. Anonymous - February 19, 2009

Those quotes can be found in Einsteins essays on the relationship between science and religion in his book Ideas and Opinions. He gave a series of lectures which have been transcribed, many of which are in that book.

14. Philip Ryan - February 19, 2009
15. Tricycle » Lopez on Buddhism and Science, Padmasambhava on avoiding false teachers, Dogen on sitting - March 17, 2009

[...] Danny Fisher points us to a piece by Buddhologist Donald S. Lopez, Jr. discussing his new book, Buddhism and Science, a cultural history of claims that Buddhism anticipated or is compatible with science, particularly the theories of Einstein. (Buddha and Einstein go way back.) [...]

16. on non-belief - Page 4 - Interfaith forums - April 15, 2009

[...] and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind. Einsteins Quotes on Buddhism Tricycle Editors Blog sorry! [...]

Anonymous - February 3, 2013

Let us not forget that human knowledge and skills alone cannot lead humanity to a happy and dignified life. Humanity has every reason to place the proclaimers of high moral standards and values above the discoverers of objective truth. What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind.
What these blessed men have given us we must guard and try to keep alive with all our strength if humanity is not to lose its dignity, the security of its existence, and its joy in living. ….

And…

Common to all these types is the anthropomorphic character of the idea of God. Only exceptionally gifted individuals or especially noble communities rise essentially above this level; in these there is found a third level of religious experience, even if it is seldom found in a pure form. I will call it the cosmic religious sense. This is hard to make clear to those who do not experience it, since it does not involve an anthropomorphic idea of God; the individual feels the vanity of human desires and aims, and the nobility and marvelous order which are revealed in nature and in the world of thought. He feels the individual destiny as an imprisonment and seeks to experience the totality of existence as a unity full of significance. Indications of this cosmic religious sense can be found even on earlier levels of development—for example, in the Psalms of David and in the Prophets. The cosmic element is much stronger in Buddhism.

..

17. on non-belief - Page 5 - Interfaith forums - April 15, 2009

[...] and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind. Einsteins Quotes on Buddhism Tricycle Editors Blog sorry! s. Context? Was the context in which he spoke meaning that he valued them as higher [...]

Anonymous - February 3, 2013

Don’t confuse yourself, guy! Neither confuse others.

Read repeatly:

This is hard to make clear to those who do not experience it, since it does not involve an anthropomorphic idea of God;

18. Taiwan chinese - April 16, 2009

Temples are the places of worship in Japanese Buddhism. Virtually every Japanese municipality has at least one temple. Temples store and display sacred Buddhist objects. Some temples used to be monasteries, and some still function as such. Some of these temples and monasteries have gained international fame while others are important for local people.

19. amrit sorli - May 24, 2009

Awakened observer is a real scientist who will create only in a favour of life and humanity. Once we will bring observing, watching, witnessing of the mind means meditation in science the whole humanity will change. We will reach beyond our egos into pure existence of eternal now. Eternity is now in this present moment of your breath. When you discover it you become independent, free human being that nobody can manipulate. You become a Real Scientist of Life.

20. no es la fe para gente ignorante? - Pgina 42 - psicofxp.com - June 18, 2009

[...] [...]

21. dharma - September 6, 2009

Perhaps it was spoken, not written.

22. Philip Ryan - September 8, 2009

A very good point, dharma, but with no record of it, must we take it on faith?

23. Billy - October 30, 2009

Has anyone ever investigated the Baha’i Faith? Here is just one of many world-conscious, cosmic quotes from its Holy Writings:

“Put all your beliefs into harmony with science; there can be no opposition, for truth is one. When religion, shorn of its superstitions, traditions,and unintelligent dogmas, shows its conformity with science, then will there be a great unifying, cleansing force in the world which will sweep before it all wars, disagreements, discords and struggles–and then will mankind be united in the power of the Love of God.
–’Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 146

24. Liebe Dich - November 23, 2009

yo… thanks for style )) s

25. amrit - November 24, 2009

universe is timeless

we live in eternal now and here

yours amrit

26. Blogger - December 29, 2009

The best example is in this blog itself. Look at the two different meanings the #4 and #16 gives to a person who has not seen the whole quote. #16 starts only from the “… and”, which does not show the names before.

——————————————————–
4. El Topo – April 12, 2008
“What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind”

I don’t think THAT one is spurious

——————————————————–16. on non-belief – Page 4 – Interfaith forums – April 15, 2009
[...] and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind.� Einstein�s Quotes on Buddhism Tricycle Editors� Blog sorry! [...]

27. AshD - February 19, 2010

Hello,

I’m from Canada :) and I think I found a new place to hang

So, what does everyone think about the Canadian Olymipic Games?

28. soillopeprenT - February 25, 2010

Hi guys,

I know this might be a bit off topic but seeing that a bunch of you own websites, where would the best place be to host. Someone recommended I use [url=http://bit.ly/aTAtZb]Blue Host[//url] for $6.95 a month which seems like a great deal. Anyone here on tricycleblog.wordpress.com using them?

29. Noel - Tricycles For Adults - May 11, 2010

Quotes have been reproduced everywhere, especially on the web. Confusing me a lot.

30. amrit - May 11, 2010

Space-time is timeless.
We live in timeless NOW.

31. Mikeharvey - May 13, 2010

Hello, from Toronto, Canada

Just a quick hello from as I’m new to the board. I’ve seen some interesting comments so far.

To be honest I’m new to forums and computers in general :)

Mike

32. May - May 25, 2010

Thanks for the songs, I will check it out.

33. la jiao shou shen - June 4, 2010

Thanks for the songs

34. islami dini - June 11, 2010

Thanks for the songs ??

35. jubakala - July 27, 2010

Hmm… I found this blog-post from Google when I was searching some posts of the rock band Editors… But, I guess it’s about some different kind of editors… So I keep searching, bye! :D

Regards,

The Editors Discography Guy

36. lebastias - August 22, 2010

The second quote is cited by Trinh Xuan Thuan in “The Quantum and the Lotus” (available in Amazon’s “Look Inside”) and the reference points to Thinley Norbu’s “Welcoming Flowers”. That’s all I can say so far.

gedanken - September 13, 2010

Regarding the supposed quote of Einstein’s on science and Buddhism, it originates from Lama Surya Das’s book Awakening the Buddha Within. He cites the quote as being from Einstein but gives absolutely no source for this quote.

I have read three biographies on Einstein and many books by Einstein, both on physics and his general writings. I have yet to come across this supposed quote of his as Buddhism being the religion of the future from any source. If he made such a statement, even if only verbal, it would have been of such significance biographers would have included it in biographies on him. Two of the biographies I have read are by physicist Abraham Pais, both a close friend and colleague of Einstein’s.

One of the alleged sources for the quote was given in a number of places on the web as a lecture Einstein gave on science and religion at the Princeton Theological Seminary on May 19, 1939. The transcript of the lecture is published in a collection of Einstein’s writings and talks entitled “Ideas and Opinions.” Nowhere in that transcript is this quote to be found. I know because I own a copy of this book and have read it.

As for the book New Glimpses From His Archives where it is also alleged this quote comes from, I think I can locate a copy of this book. If so, I will see if this quote is in this book. Personally I doubt it.

37. Zee - October 6, 2010

Children may compare their parents abilities; Students may comment on their professors’ knowledge; Religious figures may deny other religion’s concepts; Scientists may prove religions to be wrong. All the results will be the same –Confuciused.

Only when you practice different religions, can you realize the real difference. Some religions teach followers like kids, some religions teach followers like adults. There must be reason behind, but not right or wrong, good or bad.

38. RoundSparrow - October 20, 2010

Amazon.com has a searchable copy of that book also. Page 144 has a German version of the quote.

“Was die Menschheit Persönlichkeiten wie Buddha, Moses und J…”

39. A Buddhist - December 4, 2010

I am a religious nonbeliever here. I always believe in some old proverbs said “The proof of the pudding is in the eating.”, then if I want to proof what inside of Buddha’s teaching, I must practice seriously following his teachings.
I’ve practiced this way for years. One day I found that some strong fragrant came on my little space (as my shrine) on the shelf along with the voice that “These are the Buddha bones.”
I really inspected what occured to me. I saw quite a number of the delicated round golden ball in my nice, small empty bottle that I had put in very near by no reason.

I know now “the Buddha’s teachings are real. As He said He invited everyone proofs what his teachings be. I completely believe that everyone, who practices in the right way, can proof His teachings and receive the real happiness along with whatever you might have in your way.

Ruwan - June 29, 2011

The Buddha’s teachings is based on logic, on reasoning, do not believe it because of some unexplained occurrence, just learn what he taught and questions it . See if you can find a flaw in his reasoning. When you cannot you will begin to understand ,not believe.

A Buddhist - November 1, 2011

I wrote above that “if I want to proof what inside of Buddha’s teaching, I must practice seriously following his teachings. I’ve practiced this way for years.” How can I practice without consciousness to question and find the reason from practicing? I jumped my explanation on this because I have no doubt in results and no doubt any more in the Buddha’s teachings and I got Dharma, not only knowledge but wisdom that occurred inside. The unexplained occurrences are only bonus blessing to my life through my practices. His Teachings are reasonable and can be proofed, for real happiness in everyone’s life, this’s for sure.

achini - July 25, 2012
achini - July 25, 2012

@Ruwan

40. Never misquote Einstein. Especially, in religion. « The surfing butterfly - December 15, 2010
41. Gregory Wonderwheel - January 7, 2011

Just because the source of the quote isn’t found in a book makes the quote spurious. The quote most likely came from a lecture or letter. It was not unusual for Einstein to use the phrase “cosmic” in relation to religion or to put Buddhism at the top of the examples of cosmic-minded religions.

Here’s a quote that is legitimately sourced (the New York Times Magazine on November 9, 1930 pp 1-4) which does provide the foundation for believing the usual quote above is genuine even if the specific source is now lost.
“The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this.
“The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.”

http://www.endlesssearch.co.uk/science_cosmicreligion.htm

Gregory Wonderwheel - January 7, 2011

CORRECTION: The first sentence should have read “Just because the source of the quote isn’t found in a book doesn’t make the quote spurious.”

42. Philip Ryan - January 7, 2011

Great points, Gregory! Thanks for the research… getting closer!

Anonymous - December 23, 2012

Great! Gregory! Thanks for your point!
It’s definitely true that there’s no any religion to equal with the Buddhism. Practicing in the Buddhism way is the best way to reform your body and mind into having real happiness and real wisdom which can perfectly be.

43. Wonderlane - January 28, 2011

nice thank you!

44. Eranga sanjaya - April 16, 2011

Lord Buddha is the greatest Scientist in the world.
He said if any religion is consist of 8 great ways it show the correct way.He said it is a universal truth.

45. Eranga sanjaya - April 16, 2011

Lord Buddha is the greatest Scientist in the world.
He said if any religion is consist of 8 great ways it show the correct way.He said it is a universal truth.
(8 ways)

46. Leana Eisenberg - April 25, 2011

I¡¦ve read several excellent stuff here. Definitely worth bookmarking for revisiting. I surprise how a lot attempt you place to create any such great informative site.

47. Einstein Fan Club - July 17, 2011

“These quotes are rarely said to come from a particular book”

That’s because they are not from the book :)

48. James Beaver - September 16, 2011

There is a great collection of Einstein Quotes on http://www.einstein-quotes.info, containing also quotes on religion.

49. martha Hulbert - September 20, 2011

consider study of the Pali Texts to witness Buddha’s study of mind as though with a scientific curiosity for truth.

50. What did Einstein mean when he said "If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism"? - Quora - September 30, 2011

[...] I found a blog entry which searched for the origin of these quotes, and failed to find them:http://tricycleblog.wordpress.co…I studied Einstein's non-scientific writings, and don't recall him ever mentioning [...]

51. Sitthichai Pookaiyaudom - November 1, 2011

Einstein was wrong about a lot of concepts in physics. Therefore, why should we care about what he thought or said about religions, especially Buddism!

Anonymous - November 1, 2011

People who think makes mistakes. Let us be receptive to different ideas and reject what we don’t like.

Anonymous - December 25, 2012

People who thought that Einstein was wrong because he could not understand what real concepts of physics and reasonable quantum theory and etc, which Einstein had profoundly discovered. Great minds think alike. The Buddha is the wisest and expose the fact and the truth which make people get the wisdom. Why should we ignore the wisdom, the Buddha’s teachings? Why do we just believe too easily from others who never want any wisdom from the wisest but from ordinary people who never are the wisest as the Buddha?

Anonymous - December 25, 2012

Einstein was absolutely right about Buddhism.

52. Can a Scientist believe in God? - Page 6 - Religious Education Forum - November 8, 2011

[...] [...]

53. Naphtali Zimmerman - November 30, 2011

The first quote from Einstein is indeed in the book, “The Quotable Einstein” unfortunately it is packed away at the moment due to a recent move. I went on line to find it and came smack in the middle of this controversy.

54. Buddhist - January 15, 2012

Namo Amitabha… That’s why I only believe in Buddhism…

Kent Chapman - November 28, 2012

I have discovered that it is necessary, absolutely necessary, to believe in nothing. That is, we have to believe in something which has no form and no color – something which exists before all forms and colors appear. This is a very important point. No matter what god or doctrine you believe in, if you become attached to it, your belief will be based more or less on a self-centered idea… In constantly seeking to actualize your ideal, you will have no time for composure. But if you are always prepared for accepting everything we see as something appearing from nothing… then at that moment you will have perfect composure. S. Suzuki, “Zen Mind …”, p. 116

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56. Biswajit Barua - May 23, 2012

Dear sir,
I have learnt a lot from your collection on Buddhism.
Best regards,
Biswajit Barua
Administrator
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57. Babylon Slim - May 27, 2012

In the begging was the word (Latin version) (song/sound Aramaic version) If one cannot think it, one cannot say. If one cannot say it one cannot think it for one thinks with words. Thinking only enrages the reactive mind. Be still and have no thoughts between breaths. Be it Lord Buddha, Lord Jesus, Einstein, whoever, whenever, seek shelter in The One. The written word is a lie.

Anonymous - January 31, 2013

No lie’s in the Buddha’s words but self esteem of ordinary men who can’t achieve the real wisdom can lie [for his/her sake] and then, even intentionally or not, he/she has stirred it.

58. Mom of Three - July 15, 2012

He left out Mohammed. Coincidence? I doubt it, not with him. Interesting.

59. Jesse M. - July 19, 2012

wikiquote has an updated discussion of the quote in the “misattributed” section of the Einstein article–there is pretty good circumstantial evidence that the quote is an embellished version of something he said in his 1930 essay “Religion and Science” (much of which is also quoted on wikiquote, in its own section). From the article:

‘Only two sources from before 1970 can be found on google books. The first is The Theosophist: Volume 86 which seems to cover the years 1964 and 1965. The quote appears attributed to Einstein on p. 255, with the wording given as “The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend a personal God and avoid dogmas and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description.” An identical quote appears on p. 284 of The Maha Bodhi: Volume 72 published by the Maha Bodhi Society of India, which seems to contain issues from throughout 1964.

‘A number of phrases in the quote are similar to phrases in Einstein’s “Religion and Science”. Comparing the version of the quote in The Theosophist to the version of “Religion and Science” published in 1930, “a cosmic religion” in the first resembles “the cosmic religious sense” in the second; “transcend a personal God” resembles “does not involve an anthropomorphic idea of God”; “covering both the natural and the spiritual” resembles “revealed in nature and in the world of thought”; “the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity” resembles “experience the totality of existence as a unity full of significance”; and “Buddhism answers this description” resembles “The cosmic element is much stronger in Buddhism”. These phrases appear in the same order in both cases, and the ones from “Religion and Science” are all from a single paragraph of the essay.’

Anonymous - December 25, 2012

Great researches! Thanks to Jesse M. and wikipedia.

60. andrew - July 25, 2012

There are some explanations about Psychology, Sociology, another worlds & planets exept the Earth and so many things in Buddhism.
Everyone knws abt a Scientist in Psychology, called Sigmund Froid. So he has said dat, a lady cn b pregnant witout having sex. Bt bfor dat era, our Lord Buddha have preached the same thng. Dat is, any woman can b made as pregnana by the mind. So anyhow, when v r considering thez thngs, the Buddhism z noble & eminent. So As i thnk, thr z no any religion to equal with the Buddsm.

Anonymous - September 16, 2012

Do we truly know what the Buddha said? Let alone Einstien? :)

Gregory Wonderwheel - September 16, 2012

Yes we do, but we better not repeat it.

61. Most convincing fufilled Biblical prophesy? - Page 15 - Religious Education Forum - September 27, 2012

[...] The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism. Or how about Herman Hesse: Quote: [...]

62. আইনস্টাইনকে নিয়ে টানা-হেঁচড়া! » সদালাপ - October 31, 2012

[...] বৌদ্ধদের টানা-হেঁচড়া চলছে এখানে, এখানে, ও এখানে সহ আরো কয়েক জায়গায়। {নোট: [...]

63. Anonymous - December 23, 2012

As my experience, the teaching of Buddha is only way to get the “wisdom.”

64. http://tinyurl.com/argepater53795 - January 30, 2013

“Einsteins Quotes on Buddhism Tricycle Editors
Blog” was seriously enjoyable and helpful! Within the present day world that’s really difficult to deliver.
Regards, Alan

65. V.A. - February 19, 2013

An interesting site:

“This text is from an address at Princeton Theological Seminary on May 19, 1939. It presents with extreme clarity what are the different realms of religion (values) and science (facts) and also their connections. This cross-fertilization becomes problematic only when each realm wants to impose itself on the other or when a religion with an anthropomorphized God is meant to be behind any happening. This would eliminate personal responsibility and would install the priests of that religion as those more capable of deciding between truth and falsehood and so to guide the actions of everybody. The result would be to deprive religion of any value and to limit science in its search for truth.”
http://www.panarchy.org/einstein/science.religion.1939.html

Is this legitimate? Does it answer the question?

66. Anonymous - February 24, 2013

Eisntein mentionnes these quotes in his autobiography. so these arent rootless quotes Buddhists created . If you are interested find the book & read.
cheers!

67. Luis - March 11, 2013

If you know Buddhism and know Eisntein works you will see how close they approximate the conclusions. Even modern physics are similars to Buddha philosophy.

68. Joe - April 2, 2013

uh… kudos to the author for building a discussion topic that spans years of web-dom. And note, the quotes are still running around on Facebook and other online media – from noteworthy sources like Charter for Compassion among others who has incorrectly attributed various author’s writings to the Buddha… (Karen, are you listening…?) Ultimately gang — consider the source is your browser… and move on?

69. Anonymous - April 19, 2013

any person can use the Buddism so pls study Buddism befor commenting on buddism, i feel Buddhas is a the gratest Sicetist in all world.

70. ryuugakusei.info - May 19, 2013

Hello there! This is my 1st comment here so I just wanted to give a
quick shout out and tell you I really enjoy reading your articles.
Can you suggest any other blogs/websites/forums that deal with the same subjects?
Thanks!

71. Angie - September 7, 2013

Cheers for this amazing posts. I was curious
about whether you had been planning of publishing related posts to this.
Continue writing superb content articles!


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